Image Comics reveals more Walking Dead tribute variant covers

Image Comics unveiled more of its special The Walking Dead tribute covers scheduled for special release for, this coming October.

See below for select images.

The upcoming time will be the last of the company’s 25th-anniversary variant collection theme; this time in dedication to its hit coming first published back in 2003, The Walking Dead.

This final month of variants in homage to Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard’s long-running series will be released in the following schedule. Consult your local comics dealer for more information.

Available in stores on Wednesday, October 4th:

ELSEWHERE #3 by Jay Faerber & Sumeyye Kesgin, cover by Kesgin & Riley
EXTREMITY #7 by Daniel Warren Johnson, cover by Johnson
I HATE FAIRYLAND: I HATE IMAGE SPECIAL EDITION by Skottie Young, cover by Young
POSTAL #23 by Bryan Hill & Isaac Goodhart, cover by Goodhart
REGRESSION #5 by Cullen Bunn & Danny Luckert, cover by Luckert
SOUTHERN CROSS #13 by Andy Belanger & Becky Cloonan, cover by Cloonan
SLOTS #1 by Dan Panosian, cover by Panosian

Available in stores on Wednesday, October 11th:

BIRTHRIGHT #27 by Joshua Williamson, Adriano Lucas & Andrei Bressan, cover by Bressan & Lucas
BLACK SCIENCE #32 by Rick Remender & Matteo Scalera, cover by Harren
ROYAL CITY #6 by Jeff Lemire, cover by Lemire
THE WICKED + THE DIVINE #32 by Kieron Gillen & Jamie McKelvie, cover by McKelvie
Rob Liefeld’s YOUNGBLOOD #6 by Chad Bowers & Jim Towe, cover by Liefeld

Available in stores on Wednesday, October 18th:

CURSE WORDS #9 by Charles Soule & Ryan Browne, cover by Browne
DESCENDER #25 by Jeff Lemire & Dustin Nguyen, cover by Nguyen
GENERATION GONE #4 Ales Kot & Andre Araujo, cover by Araujo
GRRL SCOUTS: MAGIC SOCKS #6 by Jim Mahfood, cover by Mahfood
HORIZON #15 by Brandon Thomas, Juan Gedeon & Mike Spicer, cover by Gedeon & Spicer
KILL THE MINOTAUR #5 by Chris Pasetto, Christian Cantamessa, Jean-Francois Beaulieu & Lukas Ketner, cover by Ketner & Beaulieu
MANIFEST DESTINY #32 by Chris Dingess, Matthew Roberts & Owen Gieni, cover by Roberts & Gieni
THE REALM #2 by Seth M. Peck & Jeremy Haun, cover by Jeremy Haun
ROCKSTARS #8 by Joe Harris & Megan Hutchison, cover by Hutchison
SPY SEAL #3 by Rich Tommaso, cover by Tomasso

Available in stores on Wednesday, October 25th:

ANGELIC #2 by Si Spurrier & Caspar Wijngaard, cover by Wijngaard
COPPERHEAD #15 by Jay Faerber, Drew Moss & Ron Riley, cover by Godlewski & Riley
CROSSWIND #5 by Gail Simone & Cat Staggs, cover by Staggs
GASOLINA #2 by Sean Mackiewicz, Mat Lopes & Niko Walter, cover by Walter & Lopes
HACK/SLASH: RESURRECTION #1 by Tini Howard, Celor, K. Michael Russell, cover by Rugg
THE HARD PLACE #3 by Doug Wagner & Nic Rummel, cover by Rummel
SPAWN #279 by Todd McFarlane, cover by McFarlane
UNDERWINTER: A FIELD OF FEATHERS #1 by Ray Fawkes, cover by Fawkes
WAYWARD #24 by Jim Zub & Steven Cummings, cover by Cummings & Royce “Fooray” Southerland

Here is a peek of the recently revealed upcoming variants…

 

And more previously unveiled…

Image Comics to release 30 The Walking Dead tribute cover variants…

Image Comics will show much love for The Walking Dead, this coming October…

The upcoming time will be the last of the company’s 25th-anniversary variant collection theme; this time in dedication to its hit coming first published back in 2003, The Walking Dead.

This final month of variants will pay tribute to some of the hottest, most jaw-dropping moments from Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard’s long-running, and industry-changing series that went on to become a pop culture phenomenon.

Available in stores on Wednesday, October 4th:

ELSEWHERE #3 by Jay Faerber & Sumeyye Kesgin, cover by Kesgin & Riley
EXTREMITY #7 by Daniel Warren Johnson, cover by Johnson
I HATE FAIRYLAND: I HATE IMAGE SPECIAL EDITION by Skottie Young, cover by Young
POSTAL #23 by Bryan Hill & Isaac Goodhart, cover by Goodhart
REGRESSION #5 by Cullen Bunn & Danny Luckert, cover by Luckert
SOUTHERN CROSS #13 by Andy Belanger & Becky Cloonan, cover by Cloonan
SLOTS #1 by Dan Panosian, cover by Panosian

Available in stores on Wednesday, October 11th:

BIRTHRIGHT #27 by Joshua Williamson, Adriano Lucas & Andrei Bressan, cover by Bressan & Lucas
BLACK SCIENCE #32 by Rick Remender & Matteo Scalera, cover by Harren
ROYAL CITY #6 by Jeff Lemire, cover by Lemire
THE WICKED + THE DIVINE #32 by Kieron Gillen & Jamie McKelvie, cover by McKelvie
Rob Liefeld’s YOUNGBLOOD #6 by Chad Bowers & Jim Towe, cover by Liefeld

Available in stores on Wednesday, October 18th:

CURSE WORDS #9 by Charles Soule & Ryan Browne, cover by Browne
DESCENDER #25 by Jeff Lemire & Dustin Nguyen, cover by Nguyen
GENERATION GONE #4 Ales Kot & Andre Araujo, cover by Araujo
GRRL SCOUTS: MAGIC SOCKS #6 by Jim Mahfood, cover by Mahfood
HORIZON #15 by Brandon Thomas, Juan Gedeon & Mike Spicer, cover by Gedeon & Spicer
KILL THE MINOTAUR #5 by Chris Pasetto, Christian Cantamessa, Jean-Francois Beaulieu & Lukas Ketner, cover by Ketner & Beaulieu
MANIFEST DESTINY #32 by Chris Dingess, Matthew Roberts & Owen Gieni, cover by Roberts & Gieni
THE REALM #2 by Seth M. Peck & Jeremy Haun, cover by Jeremy Haun
ROCKSTARS #8 by Joe Harris & Megan Hutchison, cover by Hutchison
SPY SEAL #3 by Rich Tommaso, cover by Tomasso

Available in stores on Wednesday, October 25th:

ANGELIC #2 by Si Spurrier & Caspar Wijngaard, cover by Wijngaard
COPPERHEAD #15 by Jay Faerber, Drew Moss & Ron Riley, cover by Godlewski & Riley
CROSSWIND #5 by Gail Simone & Cat Staggs, cover by Staggs
GASOLINA #2 by Sean Mackiewicz, Mat Lopes & Niko Walter, cover by Walter & Lopes
HACK/SLASH: RESURRECTION #1 by Tini Howard, Celor, K. Michael Russell, cover by Rugg
THE HARD PLACE #3 by Doug Wagner & Nic Rummel, cover by Rummel
SPAWN #279 by Todd McFarlane, cover by McFarlane
UNDERWINTER: A FIELD OF FEATHERS #1 by Ray Fawkes, cover by Fawkes
WAYWARD #24 by Jim Zub & Steven Cummings, cover by Cummings & Royce “Fooray” Southerland

Here is a peek at some of the upcoming variants…

SW Comics Reading Rec : Mother Russia by Jeff McComsey

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Mother Russia

  • Writer: Jeff McComsey
  • Artist: Jeff McComsey
  • Published by: FUBAR Press (Alterna Comics)
  • Pages: 120, Publish Date: November 18, 2015, Price: $2.99
  • Notes: Collects 1-4 of the monthly series. Available in print and digital. For more info, visit alternacomics.com or ask your friendly neighborhood comic store for the print version.

Synopsis:

“Stalingrad, 1943. In the middle of a zombie apocalypse, a Soviet sniper risks her life to protect something she hasn’t seen in a long time: a perfectly healthy two-year-old baby boy.”

Personal Thoughts (minor spoilers):

I enjoy a fresh take on the zombie apocalypse genre. Our flesh-eating virus bringing carriers of undead fifth brings I feel can never be explored enough in modern horror literature.

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Also, zombies are intriguing when used as a metaphor for the various ills of our modern world. I see a degrading of humanity within zombies, till there is nothing but walking shells with strange animalistic urges. They hunger for a basic need to feed upon the living, to drag down all hopes for civilization in doing so. If not stopped, they eventually become absolute. Zombies I feel are, a violent interpretation of the worse of us from within.

As a child, I felt similar about the Nazi advance throughout Europe and the surrounding areas during the early years of World War II. The Axis spread, seemingly unstoppable in their lust to conquer and bring death, destruction along the way. Their ways were like an infection, bringing mass casualties in war especially to the Soviets, said anywhere from 7 to 43 million. For better use in horror and science fiction entertainment, Nazi’s are often picked as the perfect vessels for the undead. The terror of what they brought to the Soviet Union during World War II bought my interest to Jeff McComsey’s Mother Russia.

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Yet in this short series, we have the zombie plague taking over, but still an army joined together from the casualties of both sides. We have a heroic stand against them by a single female sniper isolated in a tower, Svetlana Gorshkov. She has little idea of how extent the virus spread, though she understands humanity is losing to the inhumanity. She cares little for hope that all will be well, just that she survives long enough to find out. Along the way, she finds a few companions (a child, a dog, a soldier) who carry on that will to survive; as she looks to protect them as well.

What follows is the best of humanity, standing against the hordes of the undead. I feel though this is science fiction, I can imagine to those who lived in the war-torn areas of the time (and similar places now), to see no end to the madness. To stand alone and be a sort of beacon of light to anyone not quite given up, is what I gathered in this series. We learn a lot about our heroine as well, as she once lived a simple life. Later, she befriends and finds common ground with a former enemy, as they both look to survive and palso protect a lost child.

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Within and throughout, are interesting sub-plots within stories. The focus is on what’s left, and worthwhile from the perspective of a child, the protective actions of a loyal pet, the kindness of good strangers, and the will to survive in a bleak setting. However, not too much talk as there is a demand for action throughout. The sequences of danger and zombie blood-letting are immense and plentiful. To mix such humanity of the characters throughout in such a gritty and terrible world is a mix that we see often in modern fiction, though not always done well. Mother Russia delivers in both, on a highly enjoyable level.

The art is great, and delivered to perfection in its black and white form. The mood of its time feels like something out a black and white cartoon or movie of its time. The greys and dull tones give the feeling of gloom and ever-present threat. Our expressionist faces in the survivors bring a sense of joy, life to the dreariness. There is exquisite detail in the surroundings of the war-torn areas, especially with the weapons and machines used. The zombies are not as much detailed, almost as messy and disjointed in every way, a perfect presentation to the disorder they bring.

Overall, Mother Russia is a worthwhile read for those who look for something more in their zombie horror, and for those who love good war stories as well. Pick us this up digital or in print, for it is also cheap but worth all the pennies needed and more.

– Orion T

SW Comics Rec: Afterlife With Archie, Vol. 1: Escape From Riverdale

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Afterlife With Archie Vol. 1: Escape From Riverdale

  • Writer: Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa
  • Artist: Francesco Francavilla, Jack Morelli
  • Published by: Archie Comics
  • Pages: 210 , Publish Date: June 4, 2014 Price: $17.99
  • Notes: collecting #1-5 of the sometimes monthly single-issue series

Synopsis:

“When Jughead’s beloved pet Hot Dog is killed in a hit and run, Jughead turns to the only person he knows who can help bring back his furry best friend — Sabrina the Teenage Witch. Using dark, forbidden magic, Sabrina is successful and Hot Dog returns to the land of the living. But he’s not the same… and soon, the darkness he brings back with him from beyond the grave begins to spread, forcing Archie, Betty, Veronica and the gang to try to escape from Riverdale!”

My Recommendation:

Jughead is hungry…for human flesh?!

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Yes! Afterlife with Archie takes place in an alternate, less cartoonish continuity of the popular Archie comics. Who thought, Archie Comics could be a source for modern horror, suspense, and drama? Yet here we. The result is terrifying, brilliant, and fun.

As a fan of horror and comics, I was hooked from the opening page. Not so much for the tired gimmick of zombies; but the attention to what makes the best of this sub-genre wonderful: the stage environment and the players present. We have suspense and supernatural horror mixed with casual social commentary. When done well, any overplayed genre can be made fresh and enjoyable.

And, I love the biting and screaming; which does well for suspense and horror elements, and for fun campy, and darkly campy comedic moments.

The overall tone is more than simply “Archie with zombies,” or a Walking Dead clone. The unique art style of Afterlife with Archie is the key. Instead of the familiar comical style we all know, we get a dramatic and dark atmosphere. The night environments, use of shadows, and angles all work together to produce a foreboding tone. Classic, spooky lettering sound effects are used well, with strategic placement to enhance the horror.

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The coloring is also superb – especially the use of red (Archie’s hair and the Riverdale “R” on his sweater) – as is the storytelling’s ominous change of background, and the biting and screaming. Much of these fantastically detailed visuals (with occasional surprise gore) go back to the classic horror comics like the EC Comics of old (Tales from the Crypt, The Vault of Horror, The Haunt of Fear) and the classic Warren Magazines (Creepy, Eerie, Vampirella).

The full story is grand and terrifying. For this Riverdale, the outbreak is real and out of control. The only way to have a sense of order is through survival. The horrifying circumstances here are based on the supernatural, where the usual hope in prevailing science for survival is further diminished. What makes Afterlife with Archie darker is how we lose familiar characters, or those we are just beginning to know, into the darkness. The terror seeks to consume, to overwhelm. We are left wondering who will survive, and keep the light, in the end.

However, not all is gloom and doom. We get some of that classic camp from the regular Archie comics. Some familiar tropes to modern horror present, such as lesser characters making light of the situation, or in an excessive state of panic. Many relationship angles happen, including the dilemma of Archie’s ongoing “intimate relationship” choice between Betty and Veronica. Others disconnect in some tragic, yet comically melodramatic ways (poor Ethel Muggs). Jughead comes full circle with his insatiable hunger, but no longer for just hamburgers. Such fun development keeps the comic enjoyable, without being too morbid.

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We also enjoy a return to classic heroism with our main character, Archie Andrews. He is brave, and a rule-breaker: a great lead character to root for, who is not concerned with impressing anyone or getting the girl. In contrast, it seems the rest of the survivors do, or at least fail to take control of their situation preferring to enjoy the comforts of safety while they can. Archie also deals with some serious, heartbreaking choices in issue four, adding maturity and development to a perpetually young character. I also feel the awesomeness of Archie’s shirt now: I feel the “R” is now a clear symbol of his boldness, and hope for Riverdale. His humble appeal and heroism make him the perfect, deserving protagonist in a plague-ridden apocalypse.

The overall pacing and plot keeps us readers in check, looking forward to each new chapter. Afterlife of Archie is an instant classic. Buy this, as it is worth every penny. Also there are bonuses, with reprinted “From the Vault: Chilling Adventures in Sorcery” black-and-white classic stories, interviews, extra artwork, and more.

Then find a nice cozy spot in the dark with a small reading light. If on a digital device turn out all the surrounding lights. Keep your windows locked and your blankets near, then enjoy the read.

– Orion T

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